Treecreeper (Certhia familiaris)

Treecreeper (Certhia familiaris)

The treecreeper is small, very active, bird that lives in trees. It has a long, slender, downcurved bill. It is speckly brown above and mainly white below. It breeds in the UK and is resident here. Birds leave their breeding territories in autumn but most range no further than 20 km. Its population is mainly stable.

Key ID Features:
Finely streaked green-brown upperparts contrast with clean white underparts.
A slight white supercilium leads to thin, slightly down-curved bill for probing in bark for insects.
Stiff brown tail feathers act as a support for climbing.
Feeding often entails flying to base of tree followed by a steady, active climb of the trunk and branches.

Overview
Scientific name: Certhia familiaris.
Family: Treecreepers (Certhidae)

Where to see them:
Best looked for on the trunks of trees in suitable woodland. In autumn and winter, it often joins flocks of tits and other small birds, so if you come across such a flock in a wood, it is worth listening out for a treecreeper among them.

Seen in UK:
All year round.

What they eat
nsects and spiders, and some seeds in winter.

Text (c) RSPB, used with permission
For more information click here
Ref:
Date:
Location:
Langford Lakes
Photographer:
Tim Tapley

Treecreeper (Certhia familiaris)

The treecreeper is small, very active, bird that lives in trees. It has a long, slender, downcurved bill. It is speckly brown above and mainly white below. It breeds in the UK and is resident here. Birds leave their breeding territories in autumn but most range no further than 20 km. Its population is mainly stable.

Key ID Features:
Finely streaked green-brown upperparts contrast with clean white underparts.
A slight white supercilium leads to thin, slightly down-curved bill for probing in bark for insects.
Stiff brown tail feathers act as a support for climbing.
Feeding often entails flying to base of tree followed by a steady, active climb of the trunk and branches.

Overview
Scientific name: Certhia familiaris.
Family: Treecreepers (Certhidae)

Where to see them:
Best looked for on the trunks of trees in suitable woodland. In autumn and winter, it often joins flocks of tits and other small birds, so if you come across such a flock in a wood, it is worth listening out for a treecreeper among them.

Seen in UK:
All year round.

What they eat
nsects and spiders, and some seeds in winter.

Text (c) RSPB, used with permission
For more information click here
Ref:
Date:
Location:
Langford Lakes
Photographer:
Tim Tapley