Redwing (Turdus iliacus)

Redwing (Turdus iliacus)

The redwing is most commonly encountered as a winter bird and is the UK's smallest true thrush. Its creamy strip above the eye and orange-red flank patches make it distinctive. They roam across the UK's countryside, feeding in fields and hedgerows, rarely visiting gardens, except in the coldest weather when snow covers the fields. Only a few pairs nest in the UK.

Key ID Features:
This brightly coloured winter visitor is a flock feeder, often associating with Fieldfare.
The dark brown back, cap and cheeks are separated by a pale stripe over the eye and at the base of the cheek.
Smaller and whiter breasted than Song Thrush with brown streaks rather than spots and rufous flanks from which it's name is derived.

Overview
Scientific name: Turdus iliacus
Family: Chats and thrushes (Turdidae)

Where to see them:
In open countryside it likes hedges and orchards as well as open, grassy fields. Will come to parks and gardens. Often joins with flocks of fieldfares.

Seen in UK:
Migrants arrive from September, with most in October and November. They leave again in March and April, although occasionally birds stay later.

What they eat
Berries and worms.

Text (c) RSPB, used with permission
For more information click here
Ref:
Date:
Location:
Edington, Wiltshire
Photographer:
Tim Tapley

Redwing (Turdus iliacus)

The redwing is most commonly encountered as a winter bird and is the UK's smallest true thrush. Its creamy strip above the eye and orange-red flank patches make it distinctive. They roam across the UK's countryside, feeding in fields and hedgerows, rarely visiting gardens, except in the coldest weather when snow covers the fields. Only a few pairs nest in the UK.

Key ID Features:
This brightly coloured winter visitor is a flock feeder, often associating with Fieldfare.
The dark brown back, cap and cheeks are separated by a pale stripe over the eye and at the base of the cheek.
Smaller and whiter breasted than Song Thrush with brown streaks rather than spots and rufous flanks from which it's name is derived.

Overview
Scientific name: Turdus iliacus
Family: Chats and thrushes (Turdidae)

Where to see them:
In open countryside it likes hedges and orchards as well as open, grassy fields. Will come to parks and gardens. Often joins with flocks of fieldfares.

Seen in UK:
Migrants arrive from September, with most in October and November. They leave again in March and April, although occasionally birds stay later.

What they eat
Berries and worms.

Text (c) RSPB, used with permission
For more information click here
Ref:
Date:
Location:
Edington, Wiltshire
Photographer:
Tim Tapley