Bullfinch (Pyrrhula pyrrhula)

Bullfinch (Pyrrhula pyrrhula)

The male is unmistakable with his bright pinkish-red breast and cheeks, grey back, black cap and tail, and bright white rump. The flash of the rump in flight and the sad call note are usually the first signs of bullfinches being present. They feed voraciously on the buds of various trees in spring and were once a 'pest' of fruit crops.

Key ID Features:
This large, stocky, impressive finch bears distinctive black hood and has a thick black bill.
The male has a vivid pink underside, slate grey back with black wings and tail.
Female is buff brown with paler brown underparts but shares all other features.
In flight white wingbars and rump are visible.
Pairs mate for life and are often seen together.

Overview
Scientific name: Pyrrhula pyrrhula
Family: Finches (Fringillidae)

Where to see them:
Woodlands, orchard and hedgerows. Best looked for at woodland edges - usually located by its mournful call.

Seen in UK:
All year round.

What they eat
Seeds, buds and insects (for young).

Text (c) RSPB, used with permission
For more information click here
Ref:
Date:
Location:
Photographer:
Tim Tapley

Bullfinch (Pyrrhula pyrrhula)

The male is unmistakable with his bright pinkish-red breast and cheeks, grey back, black cap and tail, and bright white rump. The flash of the rump in flight and the sad call note are usually the first signs of bullfinches being present. They feed voraciously on the buds of various trees in spring and were once a 'pest' of fruit crops.

Key ID Features:
This large, stocky, impressive finch bears distinctive black hood and has a thick black bill.
The male has a vivid pink underside, slate grey back with black wings and tail.
Female is buff brown with paler brown underparts but shares all other features.
In flight white wingbars and rump are visible.
Pairs mate for life and are often seen together.

Overview
Scientific name: Pyrrhula pyrrhula
Family: Finches (Fringillidae)

Where to see them:
Woodlands, orchard and hedgerows. Best looked for at woodland edges - usually located by its mournful call.

Seen in UK:
All year round.

What they eat
Seeds, buds and insects (for young).

Text (c) RSPB, used with permission
For more information click here
Ref:
Date:
Location:
Photographer:
Tim Tapley